Saturday Morning Oys – January 15th, 2022

We can discuss how dictionaries work, but I think I’m seeing (at https://www.lexico.com/en/definition/fugue and https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/fugue ) that the musical and the psychiatric meanings of fugue are senses listed in one word entry, with just one etymology section for the joint entry — thus, that they are the same word historically. Etymonline is not helpful this time.
Not only is this playing between the musical and psychiatric senses of 𝘧𝘶𝘨𝘶𝘦, the caption depends on 𝐴 as both a musical key and the indefinite article, and 𝘮𝘪𝘯𝘰𝘳 as both musical mode and an age classification.

P.S. This cartoon along with an earlier Bizarro and other aspects of fugue, minor, a-minor, and somehow emo, are all fodder for Arnold Zwicky’s blog.

Guess the punchline (an oy)

When I saw the first panel I knew what the second one would be! Ókay, it’s corny and obvious — but that’s what’s fun about it.

Here’s your chance to duplicate that experience.

First:

And here the answer (slide up to uncover):

Merry Christmas!

[2021-12-25 Repost + additions]

Reposting our message from last year, with new cartoons added in the body of the post (below last year’s — look for the animated dividers) , and last year’s comments preserved, and open for new comments!

Happy Christmas wishes!

To all who celebrate the holiday, whether as mostly religious or mostly civic

From your 2021 editors, Mitch and Winter Wallaby

[2020-12-25 post unaltered, up to next animated divider]

Merry Christmas, if you’re celebrating!

Is it exciting as an adult to get socks? Sure, they’re useful, but they hardly seem exciting. Is this because I’m a guy, and not attuned to the exciting world of sock fashion?

Is replacing bad bulbs still a thing? Is a tedious search to find the bad bulb still a thing? Were they in 2010? I thought the era where bulbs were connected in a permanent series, so that one bad bulb killed the whole chain was long, long, gone.

Do people still say “shopping days until Christmas”? It seems a bit odd – they’re all shopping days now, right?

Not a CIDU. Just a reminder that you can’t always trust Santa.

[2021-12-25 supplement]

Wait, I know this is seasonal, but is it technically a New Year carol more than Christmas?

Thanks to BillR for this one:

And sort of a combo of the previous two:

Here’s a FoxTrot from 2019, sent in by Berber, who says “I don’t recall seeing very many Foxtrot comics, although Bill Amend loves an Oy as much as the next artist.”

This Curtis is in the Awww basket.

Rob sends in a pair of Falcos on tree behavior!

Liz Climo is always a source for raising positive thinking! Rob suggested one, the other suggested itself! (Via Arnold Zwicky’s blog.)

[Each Climo cartoon has two panels, aligned vertically, with a box around the top one. I hope you don’t have trouble seeing the two instances here.]

And this Loose Parts also is from Rob:

And thanks to Brian Leahy for this real OY! scanned in, which he suggests (and we agree) is probably by Gary McCoy.

Can anybody reconstruct the story-pun about “Rudolf The Red knows rain, dear!” ? Official meteorologist to the First Soviet maybe?

(And let’s just not label this one…)

Top bird

This was sent both by Emma who says “It may be simple, but I just don’t get it!  Thanks!” and by padraig who claims “I actually did get this, but it was more like a picture puzzle than a cartoon”.

And padraig tries to clue us on what he meant by a picture puzzle by adding “The pigeon is standing on a…..” But if he’s being a stool-pigeon, why is it what the cardinal will say that is being made an issue? I’m still thinking mostly they are contesting who will be the top dog, erm, bird.

(And by the way, as long as it’s still signed as Wayno & Piraro we think it should be tagged as both Wayno and Piraro. And their blogs often discuss their collaboration, and make it clear that altho Wayno scripts and draws the Mon-Sat cartoons, Piraro consults and gives a lot of input as well.)

Even More Minor Mysteries, Ooopses, and Not-Quite-Rights

Did they slip up here on legal knowledge? Is this a criminal or a civil proceeding?

Why do I want to call this an Oy that almost works? The fact that there really is something called a hiatus hernia (or apparently more officially a hiatal hernia) does not, for me, make this a success — it’s too much “on the nose” and not a typical Crankshaft malapropism. And I don’t know if it helps or hurts that, as a little medical googling seems to reveal, bad lifting is more likely to result in an  inguinal hernia  than a hiatus hernia.

But the main issue is casual acceptance of hiatus as a general synonym for time during the covid lockdown. I don’t doubt some people use it that way, but mostly it seems restricted to an organization or project where some ongoing process had to be suspended.

This Bizarro from Boise Ed is a semi-CIDU. We agree the nickname mentioned must be “BigFoot”. But then how have normal size eight footprints been called Big for these many years? Or is he just among the first of his species to accept socialization with humans, and is younger or simply smaller than most of them? Does he always go on TV in the nude, or is that just to display his b̸i̸g̸ ̸f̸e̸e̸t̸ normal sized feet for discussion?

P.S. Later (how time flies), Wayno’s blog for that week has appeared, and this is what he had to say: “If Sasquatch were being completely honest, he’d admit that he’s an eight extra wide.”

And more: Dan Piraro, on his blog, comments “This one left some readers scratching their heads and asking what it meant, which made it all the more satisfying for those who got it by themselves. If you’re having trouble with it, it’s probably because you think it’s a monkey. It’s actually Bigfoot, who is not as tall as we’d assumed.” Hmmm, not entirely explained; or is it?

For me it was a mystery who/what that Thing is, but getting an answer turned out too easy to let this be a standalone CIDU. But after answering that, there wasn’t much of a joke, and asking for explanations didn’t promise a long or interesting discussion thread. (But I did toss it into an old Sisyphus thread.)

So the cave painters recorded the story of a hunt; and also one of the cave dwellers being felled by a falling stalactite. Oh look, there it is, the base still hanging from the ceiling and the fallen point still lying on the ground. And undisturbed after all this time – while the probable skeletal remains have been scattered or swept up. So the joke is what?

And here’s one from Le Vieux Lapin, who asks “Adam?  What am I missing here?”. Did the writer just get Noah’s name wrong? Nobody could do that. And Todd is no better a name for a scene like this. Just sayin’, It’s not canon!

And finally, let’s circle back to Pros & Cons:

(All right, I didn’t know their names but looked them up.) In the 2nd panel, when Samuel the lawyer calls himself a canary in the coal mine, is he using the image / metaphor correctly? I think basically yes, even if not entirely. (Does he expect to succumb to the dangerous outgassing sooner than others, and thereby provide a warning to all? Not exactly.)

And in the final panel, when detective Stan tries a twist comeback, does it work? Well, we get what is probably his point — *everybody* exposed to social media is already suffering from the dangerous atmosphere. But does that mean they/we are all canaries? Or that it’s too late for a canary-warning and it’s already hurting the miners, which is all participants. In the story of the traditional practice, even if you are a bird lover, the canaries are the sacrificial population and the miners are the protected population; if the gas is getting to the miners, the warning system has already failed, which I take it is most of Stan’s point.