Saturday Morning Oys – January 15th, 2022

We can discuss how dictionaries work, but I think I’m seeing (at https://www.lexico.com/en/definition/fugue and https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/fugue ) that the musical and the psychiatric meanings of fugue are senses listed in one word entry, with just one etymology section for the joint entry — thus, that they are the same word historically. Etymonline is not helpful this time.
Not only is this playing between the musical and psychiatric senses of 𝘧𝘶𝘨𝘶𝘦, the caption depends on 𝐴 as both a musical key and the indefinite article, and 𝘮𝘪𝘯𝘰𝘳 as both musical mode and an age classification.

P.S. This cartoon along with an earlier Bizarro and other aspects of fugue, minor, a-minor, and somehow emo, are all fodder for Arnold Zwicky’s blog.

Guess the punchline (an oy)

When I saw the first panel I knew what the second one would be! Ókay, it’s corny and obvious — but that’s what’s fun about it.

Here’s your chance to duplicate that experience.

First:

And here the answer (slide up to uncover):

Saturday Morning Oys – June 26th, 2021

A paradigmatic LOL-OY from Pearls:

And it’s a double-PBS week with this one from Stan:

And Stan further suggests you need geezer credentials to get the reference in this Oy-LOL, but it shouldn’t be hard for any cohort to pick up on:

A pair (will it continue?) of Oy-based punch lines from Keith Knight.
Bet “pleased to meat you” will not become the hot new greeting this year..
(Okay, these are not currently dated.)

Saturday Morning Oys – November 28th, 2020

From Andréa.

Below from Anon:

Above from Andréa.

Mitch4 says: My turn to be stupid — I looked at this and thought “Okay, decent pun, taking pro-biotic as contrast to amateur-biotic. Hey, we could also imagine pro-biotic as trying to be opposite of anti-biotic, wouldn’t that be inventive? If only there were such a term … “

Saturday Morning Oys – November 7th, 2020

You can always count on Gargle Seawater for some Oy content!

Here is Baldo (1) using an embattled English expression in its traditional form, not the disputed more-modern form, and (2) making a pun out of it.

For comparison, for those who can make use of it, also providing the Spanish version.  The pun doesn’t seem to have been attempted here.

Full-on pun for *Dingbats*.

The sender says: “It’s been over 40 years since Edith Bunker died.
Has anyone used the word ‘dingbat’ as an insult since then?” Probably not, and it may take a geezer to recall it. The *word* of course remains familiar to font-heads.

Dark side of The Horse so often breaks new frontiers in cartoon-physics! And we usually call that LOL, but here there is wordplay on “airplane mode” that should qualify for an OY.

From Andréa.

Oy!

Take a wild guess at why she’s in the dark and taking a shot.

Saturday Morning Oy – October 24th

Sent in by Andréa. This is an Oy, but also a CIDU: why so many coats?

Also from Andréa.

From Olivier.

We don’t see “Shoe” all that often around here. But this seemed like a sweet OY, and ‘just what we deserve’.

A Tomversation from Ollie.