Sunday Funnies – LOLs, January 16th, 2022

Moon hits a double today:

Sent by Ken Berkun. Neither of us tried to look up the Carolyn Hax column this may have been used to illustrate.
Does anyone want to treat it as CIDU? If you think it might be more than the officiant turning the traditional “… or forever hold your peace” into a very modern and casual alternative expression. BTW, didn’t we previously have a discussion on whether that “speak now or …” clause is still announced these days?

Saturday Morning Oys – January 15th, 2022

We can discuss how dictionaries work, but I think I’m seeing (at https://www.lexico.com/en/definition/fugue and https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/fugue ) that the musical and the psychiatric meanings of fugue are senses listed in one word entry, with just one etymology section for the joint entry — thus, that they are the same word historically. Etymonline is not helpful this time.
Not only is this playing between the musical and psychiatric senses of 𝘧𝘶𝘨𝘶𝘦, the caption depends on 𝐴 as both a musical key and the indefinite article, and 𝘮𝘪𝘯𝘰𝘳 as both musical mode and an age classification.

P.S. This cartoon along with an earlier Bizarro and other aspects of fugue, minor, a-minor, and somehow emo, are all fodder for Arnold Zwicky’s blog.

Guess the punchline (an oy)

When I saw the first panel I knew what the second one would be! Ókay, it’s corny and obvious — but that’s what’s fun about it.

Here’s your chance to duplicate that experience.

First:

And here the answer (slide up to uncover):

Sunday Funnies – LOLs, January 2nd, 2022

But come to think of it, why would Connie be surprised at any of the elements of Jeremy’s forefront concerns as depicted? These are the interests he manifests in waking life as well.

It turns out they had a whole dinosaur-themed series; so this one may lose some of the charm of the Stegosaurus showing up in the conversation out of nowhere.

I was just tickled by the key idea here, of ironic and non-ironic being explicit seating options.

This may be a word-play comic, but it was seen too late to get in the Saturday New YOy collection.

And hot off the presses!

Merry Christmas!

[2021-12-25 Repost + additions]

Reposting our message from last year, with new cartoons added in the body of the post (below last year’s — look for the animated dividers) , and last year’s comments preserved, and open for new comments!

Happy Christmas wishes!

To all who celebrate the holiday, whether as mostly religious or mostly civic

From your 2021 editors, Mitch and Winter Wallaby

[2020-12-25 post unaltered, up to next animated divider]

Merry Christmas, if you’re celebrating!

Is it exciting as an adult to get socks? Sure, they’re useful, but they hardly seem exciting. Is this because I’m a guy, and not attuned to the exciting world of sock fashion?

Is replacing bad bulbs still a thing? Is a tedious search to find the bad bulb still a thing? Were they in 2010? I thought the era where bulbs were connected in a permanent series, so that one bad bulb killed the whole chain was long, long, gone.

Do people still say “shopping days until Christmas”? It seems a bit odd – they’re all shopping days now, right?

Not a CIDU. Just a reminder that you can’t always trust Santa.

[2021-12-25 supplement]

Wait, I know this is seasonal, but is it technically a New Year carol more than Christmas?

Thanks to BillR for this one:

And sort of a combo of the previous two:

Here’s a FoxTrot from 2019, sent in by Berber, who says “I don’t recall seeing very many Foxtrot comics, although Bill Amend loves an Oy as much as the next artist.”

This Curtis is in the Awww basket.

Rob sends in a pair of Falcos on tree behavior!

Liz Climo is always a source for raising positive thinking! Rob suggested one, the other suggested itself! (Via Arnold Zwicky’s blog.)

[Each Climo cartoon has two panels, aligned vertically, with a box around the top one. I hope you don’t have trouble seeing the two instances here.]

And this Loose Parts also is from Rob:

And thanks to Brian Leahy for this real OY! scanned in, which he suggests (and we agree) is probably by Gary McCoy.

Can anybody reconstruct the story-pun about “Rudolf The Red knows rain, dear!” ? Official meteorologist to the First Soviet maybe?

(And let’s just not label this one…)

[2021 bonus repost! Happy 251!] Happy 250! (Part 2)

2021-12-16 Reposting one of the Beethoven’s Birthday posts from last year (when it was his 250th). There were two parts last year, with Part 1 collecting the Peanuts strips over the years dealing with the birthday — we’re not restoring that one right now, but it is in the archive if you need to look it up.

New comments are absolutely welcome!


A bonus posting for Beethoven’s birthday (baptismal record).

Part 1, yesterday, dipped into the history of the Peanuts strip taking note, in various ways in different years, of the occasion. But they weren’t the only ones in the world of cartooning to take note!

But Peanuts does cast a long shadow:

Sent by Andréa.

From Kilby, an on-point musical panel:

The funnies can reference Beethoven without centering on his birthday, of course, as these selections contributed by Olivier illustrate:

Which musical works get into the comics?

As seen above, the Fifth Symphony has long been a source for drinking jokes because of that peculiar fluid volume measure, one fifth (of a gallon, ICYMI). The opening three-and-one is pretty ubiquitous, though probably by now it is pure geezer to connect that with V-for-Victory.

And of course the symphonies can be referenced by number without going into anything about content. Nicknames help — plenty of “The Erotica Symphony”, not too many from “Pastoral”. The Ninth as a whole comes up sometimes, but the Ode To Joy on its own is a beloved perennial for jokes, adaptations, parodies, Flash Mobs, what you will.

I did see a reference (in a Peanuts?) to “Beethoven’s Seven Concertos” which was a rather interesting take, I thought, to make them a group despite the different solo instruments. But it turns out this was probably an allusion to a book, The Seven Concertos of Beethoven by Antony Hopkins (not the actor Anthony) whose choice of that title is less surprising after seeing he also wrote The Nine Symphonies of Beethoven.

The Sonatas come up some, particularly the Moonlight — though did you notice yesterday in the 1957 Peanuts there was even a bit of the score and a reference to the very early F Minor Sonata? This 1952 Peanuts features an excerpt from what may be the Hammerklavier:

1952-03-25

and the NYT A&D article by April Dembosky which gave me that strip also gives some context:

In a strip from 1953 Schroeder embarks on an intensive workout. He does push-ups, jumps rope, lifts weights, touches his toes, does sit-ups (“Puff, Puff”), boxes, runs (“Pant, Pant”) and finally eats (“Chomp! Chomp!”). In the last two panels he walks to his piano with determination and begins playing furiously, sweat springing from his brow.

I was wondering at the absence of the quartets, but then this image of a Thong Quartet came in:


The perhaps surprising high-frequency champ seems to me to be that wonderful Bagatelle “Für Elise”! (And this first example even elevates its significance. Despite being really lovely, it is after all, a mere bagatelle.)

And how about second-order references — cartoons about other treatments of Beethoven in popular culture? I was expecting, and saw a good many, references to the use of “Für Elise” as a ringtone. But I was quite unprepared for the allusions to a movie (and sequels!) called Beethoven and featuring a dog who bears that name!

“Hahaha, that’s a dog’s name!”

Contributed by Olivier (who may be able to clarify if that apparently nonstandard French is a particular identified variant or just what a kid might spell.)

Some interest in his general history and biography:

And it’s good to see, in cartoon format, a genuine educational interest in serious history and biographical fact!

(Several uncredited individual images above contributed by Olivier.)

How confusing! It seems the prompt “If Beethoven were alive today, he’d probably be a jazz fan” and the picture would be coming from a fan of both LvB and Miles Davis. But then the take-it-back line about being old seems to be a put-down of both Beethoven and jazz as a genre.

But it should be no surprise that jazz musicians are fans of Beethoven. There are at least two albums of jazz variations on one movement of Beethoven’s, the Allegretto from Symphony No. 7.

Possible Part 3 tomorrow? : Let’s see what contemporary cartoon series had to say on the big 250th birthday date!

Nope, nothing of note! But feel free to comment with relevant comics that were overlooked!

Top bird

This was sent both by Emma who says “It may be simple, but I just don’t get it!  Thanks!” and by padraig who claims “I actually did get this, but it was more like a picture puzzle than a cartoon”.

And padraig tries to clue us on what he meant by a picture puzzle by adding “The pigeon is standing on a…..” But if he’s being a stool-pigeon, why is it what the cardinal will say that is being made an issue? I’m still thinking mostly they are contesting who will be the top dog, erm, bird.

(And by the way, as long as it’s still signed as Wayno & Piraro we think it should be tagged as both Wayno and Piraro. And their blogs often discuss their collaboration, and make it clear that altho Wayno scripts and draws the Mon-Sat cartoons, Piraro consults and gives a lot of input as well.)