No shift, Sherlock

Sent by Michelle, as a LOL/OY maybe (she says “Love this one!”). But it is sort of unclear to me! Yes, of course I recognize the underlying pun on the modern expression for dismissing something as obvious. But I don’t quite get the “No shift” as applied in context to this scene.

Sadly, I’m missing something. I don’t see what the mystery or investigation is here – when Holmes says “We must get to the bottom of this”, what is the *this*? And if “no shift” is meant to be part of the answer, is it that the car was built leaving out the transmission; or that the transmission has been stolen; or just that the driver failed to shift when they should have? Also, why are the wheels splayed? Is that just his stylization of “very old model car”? Or is it meant to show there was an accident?

Maybe I’m just expanding on “Comic I don’t understand” to carp on aspects of the cartoon. Sorry, but that happens sometimes, I guess.

BTW, there are no spoilers for my questions at the Tomversations blog entry, but there is an amusing background note about his previous attempt to use this idea, and reliance on a different meaning of “shift”.

Saturday Morning Oys – August 28th, 2021

This was a momentary CIDU, for want of a comma. Sent by Boise Ed. Ed did some research on our behalf and reports “If you look in the [GoComics] comments, you’ll see that it caught Mark Parisi by surprise.”

And a longer-puzzling CIDU-oy: I still can’t figure out the intended real-life musical pair being referred to. (Searching got me to an article mentioning opera director Robert Carsen and “superstar soprano Renée Fleming” — but the characters in the cartoon are not doing opera.)