Cartoon Art?

The “pointillism” is a nice joke. But is it the joke for the whole thing?

Oh wait, I started to ask about “punch line” but then connected that phrase to the boxing gloves and the guy knocked to the floor … could the punch be the punch line?? Nah.

So what is this about?


P.S, Bonus identification quiz! “Twenty-one decisions in a row, and only five on points, the rest was all K.O. Jackson and Johnson, Murphy and Bronson, one by one they come and one by one to Dreamland they go!”

11 Comments

  1. But it is pretty cartoonish to have a painting punch you. Maybe the realistic part is that there are actual consequences to the punch?

  2. Yup. “Realism”: the painting was so realistic that it punched him.

    I can’t quite manage to make a word-play based on Trompe-l’œil . How would you say “strike the eye”?

  3. “I can’t quite manage to make a word-play based on Trompe-l’œil .”

    How about: “Thump-l’oeil”

  4. Yes, the guy on the ground beneath the picture of the boxer represents ‘realism’. And the guy pointing at the guy on the ground represents ‘pointillism’. It’s Cartoon Art 101. 😁

  5. P.S. I must have been tired when posting this:

    — Forgot to put in tags for cartoonist name and strip (panel) title. Has been corrected.
    — Forgot to put in a “sent in by” credit. And not corrected, as I can’t find it in email.
    — Posted a song puzzle challenge, and forgot to acknowledge the winners (congrats, deety and Pete!) or give the identification for others. It’s “Stan’ Up and Fight” from Carmen Jones, Oscar Hammerstein’s reworking of the story in the opera Carmen as a Broadway musical in the early 1950s, changing the story to fit the American South during the war, with an all-Black cast, and turning some of the bigger numbers from the opera into songs with music based on Bizet’s and lyrics by Hammerstein loosely based on corresponding numbers in the opera. This song corresponds to the “Toreador Song” and is sung by prizefighter Husky Miller, the character corresponding to Escamillo the bullfighter.

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