22 Comments

  1. Thanks for the update!

    Looking at the Saturday conclusion, with the markers, I was reminded of the tv series “Woke” (based loosely on his early career). An animated marker pen became an imaginary friend / adviser / prod. But I wasn’t thinking of that animated intruder when credits ran by and showed J B Smoove as “Marker”. I was puzzled as I couldn’t remember seeing that actor (who I would def recognize) nor remembering a person named Marker. Finally clicked that it was the voice-acting role for the animated marker pen.

  2. This is likely an imaginative leap from “cash for guns” programs, since he posits a government involvement. (Or wasn’t there a “cash for clunkers” program in the automobile sense? To get polluting cars off the road…?)

    But if we just look at the idea of comics critique outlets, I bet he was thinking more of the Curmudgeon site than CIDU (if at all). That other one goes in for sometimes stringent mockery, moreso than seems common here.

  3. “(Or wasn’t there a “cash for clunkers” program in the automobile sense? To get polluting cars off the road…?)”

    Yes, President Obama instigated it. That’s why I mentioned that these are reruns.

  4. I don’t think it has ANYthing to do with Comics Curmudgeon or CIDU . . . I doubt they were extant at that time, or at least not as well known.

  5. There have also from time to time been “reader surveys” at (paper) newspapers to drop some old comics to make way for new ones.

  6. I remember “Cash for Clunkers” vividly because of the huge amount of money allocated by the government to get high polluting cars, exempt due to age, off of the roads, .. unusual even back then. (I’m now aching a little bit from the memory of all the classics that were scrapped.)
    All my Mom’s relatives lived in the San Bernardino valley east of L.A. where the pollution pooled thanks to the blocking mountain range (made famous by an episode of the Beverly Hillbillies where Phil Silver’s scheming character was raising money for a fake project to drill a huge hole through it). When we’d visit in the 1960s and 1970s, the grey air and smog alerts were frighteningly memorable.

  7. Doubly interesting since (1) this strip is in reruns, and (2) GoComics is purging a number of new strips — they seem to be more dependent than ever on classics: Calvin and Hobbes, Cul de Sac, Classic Dilbert, Cathy … It’s like those symphony orchestras that only play works out of copyright (and that the audience is familiar with).

  8. “I don’t think it has ANYthing to do with Comics Curmudgeon or CIDU . . . I doubt they were extant at that time, or at least not as well known.”

    I have CIDU files from 1999, ten years before this comic appeared. (Those files are most of the “While you’re waiting” jokes, back when it took forever to load a page with a single image on it.) But I agree that it has nothing to do with CIDU.

  9. Even if I didn’t know TKL was in reruns, the presence of a Matt Groening drawing from Life in Hell would have been a pretty serious giveaway.

  10. “Even if I didn’t know TKL was in reruns, the presence of a Matt Groening drawing from Life in Hell would have been a pretty serious giveaway.”

    Oh. I thought that was “Rabbits against Magic”

  11. I’ve mentioned the Big Picture by Lennie Peterson. That was a (no longer) syndicated strip that he revived as basically a personal project. He recently announced that he was going to retire from that, although he said it had nothing to do with GoComics, that he had a good relationship there. He is running repeats, but they are selected ones and on Monday he had a new one to talk about the old days.

  12. I started reading Big Picture only very close to the end. But it seemed notable (maybe I mean “odd”) for being daily in a formal sense — there would be a new entry every day or weekday at GoComics with its own spot on the calendar and its own likes count and its own page of comments — but exactly or essentially the same comic for two or three days running. Fans in the comments would sometimes carry out a “find the differences” game.

    Also notable for how involved the artist gets in the comments (which is continuing afresh with the reboot), and how barbative he gets with some commenters — even to the point of calling them out by handle in subsequent episodes of the strip! (This happened to one of our regular CIDUers, who tried to answer back, but didn’t make much headway with the coterie.)

  13. Yeah, he did that to me . . . didn’t like my comment. That must be pretty usual for me, as I just got banned from YouTube for same. Geez, these people are thin-skinned, for being out in public.

  14. One part of the automotive “Cash for Clunkers” program was that the cars would have something poured into the engine that would ruin it, so that they couldn’t be stolen, resold and end up back on the road polluting the atmosphere again.

    The equivalent for the comic strip situation would be that the old strips would continue to be produced but with terrible pointless or stale old jokes or recycled ideas so that newspapers would drop them and …

    no wait, that’s been tried already and it doesn’t work.

  15. When Lennie revived the strip, he didn’t have to worry about syndication lead times (recently discussed there). He could have strips that featured recent current events, or as mentioned respond to reader comments.

  16. I had heard stories of “classic” cars brought in for the CFC program, but I think those were fairly rare. The intent was to get the vast majority of mid-age old cars that were held together with ducktape and baling wire, and were fuel inefficient. Sadly my car at the time wasn’t eligible. Also I thought at the time the program was to help the sales of new cars that were piling up due to the recession.

  17. Thank you Grawlix. and also “Mark in Boston” for reminding me of the (wow, I’m having trouble writing it) stuff poured into the engine. That’s surely what made it so memorable for me.

  18. The Thursday strip did not show “bear arms” they look more like some sort of bird leg – and trust me, with all of the teddy bears and their friends in this house, I know what bear arms look like.

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