15 Comments

  1. I assume the pregnancy one is about an adultery-reveal. But the postures, staging configurations, and similarity of the character appearances make it difficult to follow the timing and where the joke appears.

  2. Yes, Nathan is right, but it’s a little hard to tell with the crudity of the character designs in C+H.

    I don’t get the Trix Rabbit one. I mean, I get it, but surely the commercials established that, as a rabbit, he had a) no money, and b) no store that would allow him in to buy Trix.

  3. I don’t get the first one. Is he a well-known villainous character, for instance of the type supposed to tie women to railroad tracks in olden times? His outfit and mug look a bit 19thC, and he has a dodgy monobrow long supposed to be a marker of wrong’uns, and she is certainly bound with ropes. Or is it some kind of sado-masochist bondage thing between them?

  4. @narmitaj- The trope in America is that the evil landlord ties the helpless damsel on the railroad tracks unless she agrees to marry him in exchange for the deed to her house (yeah, that never made sense to me, either). This comic flips the trope as it turns out the damsel does find out she loves the landlord after all. Probably shortly after she realizes she also likes bondage games…

  5. There’s an image of Snidely Whiplash (and Nell, plus Dudley Do-Right) waiting in moderation, but I don’t want to repeat the links, for fear of getting re-moderated.

  6. “but surely the commercials established that, as a rabbit, he had a) no money, and b) no store that would allow him in to buy Trix.”

    If they got into that level of detail it’d be dark indeed.

    “Is he a well-known villainous character, for instance of the type supposed to tie women to railroad tracks in olden times? ”

    Uh… yes?

  7. There was musical off Broadway play in the 1960s called “The Drunkard” done by a then barely known Barry Manilow (he played the piano for the production also) that has the typical story – sans train. The rent is overdue, the evil landlord lusts over the daughter of the poor widow… Has such memorable songs (and they must be if I still remember them) as “Look up to Heaven and say Down with Demon Rum”, “Grass is better than Alcohol”, and “Shall I be the Rich Man’s Darling or Shall I Be the Young Man’s Slave”.

    My dad’s cousin was the accountant for the production and when he was not well, my dad took over for him for awhile and we all went to see the show – and the temple sisterhood ended up going at a different time as a fundraiser…

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