20 Comments

  1. Correct me if I’m wrong, but I always assumed the hook-things on the kind of mailbox he has are intended for newspapers.

    I don’t get the joke, but there must be some kind of irony there.

  2. I think the drawing reflects his impression of how heavy the holiday advertisements have become, in comparison to the normal, threadbare editions that have become standard in the Internet era of dead-tree publishing.

  3. Correct me if I’m wrong, but I always assumed the hook-things on the kind of mailbox he has are intended for newspapers.

    Newspapers are rarely delivered by mail, except for out-of-town papers and possibly some rural situations. Here, the papers are thrown on the lawn.

  4. The hangers underneath are not considered to be part of the mailbox which can legally (even if you own it) only have USPS delivered mail placed in it, so it was legal for newspapers to be hung on them as was their purpose.

    We used to get our newspaper in a tube from them – which is at our house line not the street they are many places. Then they went to “an all flip delivery” which meant that they tossed it on the driveway – at the same time becoming a morning paper instead of afternoon and getting rid of the children news carriers for adults. I wrote a letter to the publisher pointing out that my mother taught me never to pick up anything lying on the ground as it is garbage. I told him I was sure his mother taught him this also. I asked if the newspaper was garbage that it was being thrown on the ground. I do tip for mu paper being put in the tube. Right now my paper has been vacation hold since March – with it going off of same for 2 days at the start of May and June. I am reading it online as I don’t want to touch the real paper – and their online paper is not well done as a website.

  5. “mailbox which can legally (even if you own it) only have USPS delivered mail placed in it” – I didn’t know that. In that case, since in the US you don’t have letterboxes in your front door, where do non-USPS hand-delivered things such as election flyers, local business leaflets, personal birthday & Xmas cards it seems daft to send by mail as you don’t live far away, etc, all go?

    Our daily newspaper gets pushed half-through the front door letterbox (which is not owned by the Royal Mail). The “chucking it on the lawn or driveway” procedure seems to ignore the vagaries of the weather – and if US newspapers are routinely delivered wrapped in plastic for water protection (ours generally aren’t, except the pack of supplementary weekend magazines), that isn’t helping the overall situation. Even our Sunday papers can usually fit through the letter box.

  6. @MerylA, if you mean Newsday, it’s just plain bad as a newspaper, or was the last time I read it regularly, some years ago. I read the Washington Post and some others instead, 99% of the time. Local news from community papers, News 12 (same owner as Newsday) and such.

  7. @narmitaj:

    “in the US you don’t have letterboxes in your front door”. Some people still do, though it’s not common.

    “where do non-USPS hand-delivered things such as election flyers, local business leaflets, personal birthday & Xmas cards it seems daft to send by mail as you don’t live far away, etc, all go?” They are either sent through mail (which doesn’t seem daft to us) or hand-delivered (often hung on a doorknob, especially business leaflets).

  8. @ narmitaj – The restriction on “official” use of the USPS mailboxes dates from the time when it was a government agency and de-facto monopoly. Given the way that the USPS has been degraded in recent years, I doubt that this exclusivity provision is still part of the official regulations, but it probably remains embedded in the consciousness of many Americans.

  9. Or it could be “Best Food Day” as the papers call it, with all the grocery store ad inserts. I stopped getting the paper newspaper 6 months ago, and they still stuff all the ads in my mailbox every Wednesday.

  10. In France, we have a law: if you stick a ‘No ads’ sticker on your door/mailbox, then you don’t get them. It works.

  11. My Boy Scout Troop, a long time ago, was sponsored by our neighborhood association, and we delivered their newsletter. We were trained to never put it in the mailbox, but stick it in the railing by the front door. Today we get leaflets on our porch.
    And our paper gets delivered to our driveway.
    As for the comic, no doubt a memory of thick newspapers during Christmas shopping season, back in the days when magazines like the New Yorker were thick also.

  12. Last Sunday’s Boston Globe had only one or two very skinny advertising inserts.

  13. Yes, most houses these days have external mailboxes instead of door slots. More and more, I’m even seeing new subdivisions where there is one location, with individual mailboxes, for a whole block, kind of like the mailbox area of an apartment house. People there have to walk down the street, key in hand, to retrieve their mail.

  14. Walgreens has announced that they will have digital-only ads for the time being. That’s one fewer in the Sunday paper.

  15. Boise Ed – The group mailboxes in newer construction is something that USPS favors as it is quicker for mail to be put it into same than when the delivery person has to go door to door.

    The shopping mall that the Ikea we go to (used to go to in normal times and hope to go to again) for dinner has group mail boxes for the stores near the door near Ikea so the group boxes are being used for businesses also.

    narmitaj – in areas where there is what is called “rural” delivery, areas where people live on larger pieces of land where the homes/businesses are spread apart – such as farms – and not along walk able streets, mail boxes are placed at the roadside (often only on one of side of the road – one might have to put their mail box on the neighbor’s land across the road), if one gets a newspaper delivered they will get a “tube” from the newspaper it to use for delivery of the newspaper. These are open ended large, squared off tubes that the newspaper fits into. They are often on the same post (stuck into the ground) as the mail box.

    We have one of these newspaper tubes but it is located near our house not at the street. During the earlier part of our shelter at home for corona virus my sister needed to have me sign some papers in reference to the sale of my mother’s house and we were looking to do this “contactless”. She emailed the papers to me. I signed them and left them (in an envelope) in our newspaper tube as the particular mailbox we have has a front with very limited entry for the postal carrier to put mail into the box and the other end of the box, where we remove the mail, is locked closed. I did not want to take a chance on my leaving the papers for her and having them fall into the mail box and she would not be able to retrieve them.

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