17 Comments

  1. Not sure but sometimes Robin would end up getting apprehended by the bad guys and Batman had to come to the rescue. Maybe this is their way of saying that Robin can be more of a hinderance than help.

  2. Typical New Yorker cartoon- meant to be wry but not funny.

    At least one nice Easter Egg, though- that’s Avengers’ Tower in the skyline..

  3. The now-old animated series “Tiny Toons Adventures” had a character messing with the Batmobile. An accidentally launched missile carved a giant bat signal on the moon. Instantly a second, smaller missile carved a little “TM” next to it.

  4. “Typical New Yorker cartoon- meant to be wry but not funny.”

    That’s a good way of putting it. I see this as simply saying what many readers are thinking, that they don’t like Robin and don’t want him to show up. That there is no way of saying “that guy you date and are planning to marry— we don’t like him and want you to leave him at home whenever we socialize— but, that’s okay, isn’t it?” but we often wish there were. Commissioner Gordon is pretending it’s socially acceptable.

    “I see it as a reference to “We need an ambulance but not the fire truck” type of joke.” It probably is. I just wish I knew what that meant.

  5. The joke is making Robin, who’s standing right there, feel bad. Some people do find that funny. I’m not one of them, but I know they exist.

  6. I wonder how many super-heroes have their initial on the front of their costume like Robin to help people remember who they are?

    Oh, hi, Sssstanley? Steven? Damn, what is his name? I can’t remember. Something that ends in “man” like Batman and Aquaman. Superiorman. Soupnaziman. Souperman, that’s it!

  7. “The joke is making Robin, who’s standing right there, feel bad.”

    The original Robin got old and independent enough to leave Batman and spend all his time with the New Teen Titans. He changed his name (and costume) to become “Nightwing” and Batman took on a new Robin. The new Robin character wasn’t popular, and DC ran a poll to decide whether or not to keep him. The public voted to kill him, and DC obliged (although they later retconned him back alive again). There’ve been a couple of other Robins since.

    “I wonder how many super-heroes have their initial on the front of their costume like Robin to help people remember who they are?”

    Well, Captain America has an “A”. The X-Men all have X’s, as have several of their spinoff teams. I believe Giant-Man had one. The Fantastic 4 have “4” logos, except for Johnny (and, for the TV show, H.E.R.B.i.E.) and when she’s invisible, Invisible Woman obviously has no logo. Black Goliath has a G, and Daredevil has a 2-interlocked-D logo. Spider-Man doesn’t have an “S”, but he DOES have a spider. That’s all I have ready on the top of my head. I think Wonder Man had a W, but it was more like a stripe.

  8. @MiB – In the first “Incredibles” movie, the villain “Syndrome” wears a suit with a gigantic “S” covering the entire torso.
    P.S. In the DVD extra “Jack-Jack Attack”, Syndrome lies to the family babysitter that the “S” stands for “sitter”, explaining that if he had taken “babysitter”, he would have been going around wearing a big “BS”.

  9. “I wonder how many super-heroes have their initial on the front of their costume like Robin to help people remember who they are?”

    Lots. And nearly always a logo. The first three or four issues of the Fantastic Four, they deliberately didn’t have costumes. But the reader response was confusion. Costumes are a huge part of the mythos.

    Anyway, Wonder Woman and Captain America have letters as of course do the X-men.

  10. woozy: ” The first three or four issues of the Fantastic Four, they deliberately didn’t have costumes.”

    Only the first two issues. Costumes (and the FantastiCar) arrived in issue #3, though Thing tore most of his off within a few panels, saying something like “I’m not going to wear this stupid costume.” (He did condescend to leave a shortened version of the pants in place.)

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