19 Comments

  1. The creature flips out because he is offended by the idea that stickman is eating animals. When it is explained to him that they’re just in the shape of animals, he gets into it. Like if someone tells you that Franco American canned spaghetti is Italian cuisine, you’ll be offended on behalf of all Italians. If they tell you to think of it as tomato soup with noodles, you realize it’s pretty good.

  2. I have no idea what’s going on, but it reminds me of this picture found on the web. You might enjoy it at least as much as this comic.

  3. Somewhere, some crazed animal-rights activist is planning to release “All-Natural Vegan Vegetable Crackers”, with a stunning variety of politically correct shapes (broccoli, carrots, cauliflower, etc.). It’s sure to be a major hit in food co-ops across the nation. Right-minded (or rather: left-minded) parents will all buy a box for their children, but since none of those kids will be crazy enough to actually taste the putrid things, they will have an effective kitchen shelf-life lasting decades, and nobody will ever discover that they taste like $$##!!++.

  4. @Arhtur: I’d say the 4th panel is just riffing on the fact that animal crackers (especially the frosted cookie kind) tend to be mostly amorphous blobs that vaguely resemble animals.

  5. I took the forth panel as a meta joke: It’s unclear what kind of “animal” the being on the right is supposed to be and he/she is perplexed about the shape of one of the crackers. A bit of lampshade hanging if you ask me.

    Markus

  6. “Somewhere, some crazed animal-rights activist is planning to release “All-Natural Vegan Vegetable Crackers”, with a stunning variety of politically correct shapes (broccoli, carrots, cauliflower, etc.).”

    Well, they did release them from the cages. The boxes used to be in the shape of trailer cages and depicted animals in cages as though is a circus lot. Now the depict animals free on the plains. I don’t know if the box is supposed to resemble a sightseeing safari car or if they still have the shoestring handle.

    The fourth panel is “getting into it”. It was a slide into the creature sliding completely into the actions that humans do. I say as DemetriosX saw it I like Markus’ meta-interpretation.

  7. Oddly enough I don’t recall any horror regarding humans eating gingerbread men.

    Re: ” The boxes used to be in the shape of trailer cages …”

    Circus wagons! (from the era of train-hauled circuses, when select wagons were pulled by horses through town at each stop for a promotional parade), For many towns, the circus was the most exciting thing all year, hence the packaging.

  8. “Oddly enough I don’t recall any horror regarding humans eating gingerbread men.”

    But there’s lots of jokes about it…..

  9. @Grawlix: I’ve never seen a real train-hauled circus, but I’ve seen my baby-sister hauling her Fisher Price circus train, 40 years ago.
    Animal crackers are cool, but they were superseded by dinosaur crackers:

  10. Milwaukee, WI used to have a yearly circus parade, complete with animals and [antique] train cars. The trains came from Baraboo, where there is a circus museum, and they’d come in the night before and park in a designated area where folks could come and look at ’em all for free. The actor from McHale’s Navy who was not Tim Conway would always be the Big Kahuna of the parade, ’cause I guess he liked clowns.

    Anyway, it was all a big deal, ’til it wasn’t and they had to stop doing it. When Hubby’s daughter was young, we went, but only once.

  11. I think I might have a VHS tape of a TV broadcast of the Great Circus Parade. It was big enough to get national attention. I’ve been to the circus museum in Baraboo, but it was so long ago I don’t really remember it. I did see, though, a selection of circus wagons from the Baraboo collection displayed at the Big E (Eastern States Exposition) in W. Springfield, Massachusetts back in the ’90s.

    In the late ’80s I saw a lovely very large miniature circus (complete with rail yard and circus train and assorted wagons) set up temporarily at the Henry Ford Museum (in Michigan) that in later years has been set up on permanent display in Florida.

    There are clubs dedicated to building and displaying miniature circuses of all types, including the classic train-borne and modern truck-hauled versions.

    I was not aware of “The Man Who Traveled In Elephants”, and happened to find it online just now. I found it beautiful and moving.

  12. Library system doesn’t have this book, so I purchased a used one on amazon – which, BTW, has made quite a bit o’ money from books you all have recommended. I was surprised at how many books he’s written, and they all look interesting . . . might be time to visit the used book shop. I don’t know why the library system hasn’t even ONE of his books.

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