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Comments on: Your Miscellaneous Comments http://comicsidontunderstand.com/wordpress wee fish ewe a-mare e-gret moose pan-da hip-po gnu deer! - S. Boynton Sun, 21 Jan 2018 02:37:40 +0000 http://wordpress.org/?v=2.3.1 By: CIDU Bill http://comicsidontunderstand.com/wordpress/your-miscellaneous-comments/#comment-209360 CIDU Bill Sat, 20 Jan 2018 05:31:08 +0000 http://comicsidontunderstand.com/wordpress/your-miscellaneous-comments/#comment-209360 Well, THIS is a bad sign: the customer service person I spoke with the other day gave me an e-mail address I could use to get follow-ups. And the address is invalid. I never had the experience, when I was younger, of a girl giving me a fake phone number so I couldn't actually call her, but now a customer service woman from GoDaddy's done it to me! Well, THIS is a bad sign: the customer service person I spoke with the other day gave me an e-mail address I could use to get follow-ups. And the address is invalid.

I never had the experience, when I was younger, of a girl giving me a fake phone number so I couldn’t actually call her, but now a customer service woman from GoDaddy’s done it to me!

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By: Brian in STL http://comicsidontunderstand.com/wordpress/your-miscellaneous-comments/#comment-209358 Brian in STL Fri, 19 Jan 2018 16:46:02 +0000 http://comicsidontunderstand.com/wordpress/your-miscellaneous-comments/#comment-209358 Probably the best idea would be to have someone post to that usenet thread once the problem is fixed. It's true that in the future someone might read it and go to yours anyway, but I think we're talking such a small number of people that the effect will be very small. Probably the best idea would be to have someone post to that usenet thread once the problem is fixed. It’s true that in the future someone might read it and go to yours anyway, but I think we’re talking such a small number of people that the effect will be very small.

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By: larK http://comicsidontunderstand.com/wordpress/your-miscellaneous-comments/#comment-209356 larK Fri, 19 Jan 2018 12:57:43 +0000 http://comicsidontunderstand.com/wordpress/your-miscellaneous-comments/#comment-209356 No, Bill, it was certainly not your comment I was alluding to -- you fully get the semi-clandestine nature I am going for. It was that on RACS someone posted a direct link to the shadow site, so that that link is now forever there on Google's index. I thought it was kind of clear I was trying to avoid that (certainly <i>you</i> got it), I mean, otherwise, why not just post of direct link here instead of being circuitous about it? And yes, Usenet lives forever. I once had some wisenheimer resurrect a comment of mine off Usenet some 20 years later on some forum I've never been to, and then the forum toadies spent a good long time kicking me and burning me in effigy because they didn't like what I had had to say 20 years before. And scarily their goto method was to try and doxx me -- as if that would put me in my place for daring to have a contrary opinion 20 years earlier -- and even more scary was how bad they were at it. My name full name signed the post, and the best they were able to come up with was my LinkedIn page, which I have long ago given up for satire. The best part of all this was I didn't even find out I was being mortally insulted in this forum until 2 or 3 years after this all went down when I happened to do a vanity Google search on my name (and all the clear links to me and pictures of my life and even my address and phone number (old, but don't tell them that) where there for the taking from a simple Google search ...) Even here with my semi-obscurity, I know anyone who really wants to can trivially find out all about me based on the address (sorry, mitch4 -- domain name!) it's hosted from. Still, I would have been happier without a permanent link in Google... No, Bill, it was certainly not your comment I was alluding to — you fully get the semi-clandestine nature I am going for. It was that on RACS someone posted a direct link to the shadow site, so that that link is now forever there on Google’s index. I thought it was kind of clear I was trying to avoid that (certainly you got it), I mean, otherwise, why not just post of direct link here instead of being circuitous about it?

And yes, Usenet lives forever. I once had some wisenheimer resurrect a comment of mine off Usenet some 20 years later on some forum I’ve never been to, and then the forum toadies spent a good long time kicking me and burning me in effigy because they didn’t like what I had had to say 20 years before. And scarily their goto method was to try and doxx me — as if that would put me in my place for daring to have a contrary opinion 20 years earlier — and even more scary was how bad they were at it. My name full name signed the post, and the best they were able to come up with was my LinkedIn page, which I have long ago given up for satire. The best part of all this was I didn’t even find out I was being mortally insulted in this forum until 2 or 3 years after this all went down when I happened to do a vanity Google search on my name (and all the clear links to me and pictures of my life and even my address and phone number (old, but don’t tell them that) where there for the taking from a simple Google search …)

Even here with my semi-obscurity, I know anyone who really wants to can trivially find out all about me based on the address (sorry, mitch4 — domain name!) it’s hosted from. Still, I would have been happier without a permanent link in Google…

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By: Olivier http://comicsidontunderstand.com/wordpress/your-miscellaneous-comments/#comment-209347 Olivier Fri, 19 Jan 2018 07:27:05 +0000 http://comicsidontunderstand.com/wordpress/your-miscellaneous-comments/#comment-209347 @mitch4: now, I feel like I somewhat understand what's going on, so thanks ! @mitch4: now, I feel like I somewhat understand what’s going on, so thanks !

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By: CIDU Bill http://comicsidontunderstand.com/wordpress/your-miscellaneous-comments/#comment-209344 CIDU Bill Fri, 19 Jan 2018 05:51:47 +0000 http://comicsidontunderstand.com/wordpress/your-miscellaneous-comments/#comment-209344 larK, in case you misunderstood my comment about "a new CIDU is up," rest assured that I have been not been publicizing this temporary version, because I know we're guests on your server: I was referring to the fact that I used to use RACS to announce the site's weekly-ish updates. larK, in case you misunderstood my comment about “a new CIDU is up,” rest assured that I have been not been publicizing this temporary version, because I know we’re guests on your server: I was referring to the fact that I used to use RACS to announce the site’s weekly-ish updates.

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By: Brian in STL http://comicsidontunderstand.com/wordpress/your-miscellaneous-comments/#comment-209343 Brian in STL Fri, 19 Jan 2018 05:43:16 +0000 http://comicsidontunderstand.com/wordpress/your-miscellaneous-comments/#comment-209343 Could you expand on that? Could you expand on that?

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By: mitch4 http://comicsidontunderstand.com/wordpress/your-miscellaneous-comments/#comment-209342 mitch4 Fri, 19 Jan 2018 03:52:28 +0000 http://comicsidontunderstand.com/wordpress/your-miscellaneous-comments/#comment-209342 One thing thing that may be going wrong is if the web server software is querying the backend database MySQL at the worng address, because their own <b>internal</b> DNS has got it wrong. That makes WP in the web server (and the PHP and Apache programs underlying it) think those tables are just missing, as though they were erased somehow. Those are the error messages we see, about missing tables. But though that interrupts things on the web service so we dont see good pages in ordinary web browsing, clearly it is able to go on with things well enough in the background, so that the scraping and cleaning/filtering works. If goDaddy is just testing that a DNS change has propagated, that seems already done, and accounts for why they repeatedly think their work is done. In terms of testing, of course they absolutely have to just try raising the site in a web browser, as Bill has been telling them. But then, in terms of testing for what's causing the errors we see and they will see, I hope they focus on the MySQL backend connection, and the things that can go wrong there. One possibility is my odd hunch about internal DNS; but there could also be problems with authentication to MySQL or actual damage to the database at some point. Errors with the MySQL database and how the server is connecting to it are not, strictly speaking, WordPress errors, though it's related and could go under that label if it helps. But it should not go under that label if that is GoDaddy hosting support making an excuse that it is not their problem to solve anymore. continued wishes for good luck! One thing thing that may be going wrong is if the web server software is querying the backend database MySQL at the worng address, because their own internal DNS has got it wrong. That makes WP in the web server (and the PHP and Apache programs underlying it) think those tables are just missing, as though they were erased somehow. Those are the error messages we see, about missing tables. But though that interrupts things on the web service so we dont see good pages in ordinary web browsing, clearly it is able to go on with things well enough in the background, so that the scraping and cleaning/filtering works.

If goDaddy is just testing that a DNS change has propagated, that seems already done, and accounts for why they repeatedly think their work is done. In terms of testing, of course they absolutely have to just try raising the site in a web browser, as Bill has been telling them.
But then, in terms of testing for what’s causing the errors we see and they will see, I hope they focus on the MySQL backend connection, and the things that can go wrong there. One possibility is my odd hunch about internal DNS; but there could also be problems with authentication to MySQL or actual damage to the database at some point.

Errors with the MySQL database and how the server is connecting to it are not, strictly speaking, WordPress errors, though it’s related and could go under that label if it helps. But it should not go under that label if that is GoDaddy hosting support making an excuse that it is not their problem to solve anymore.

continued wishes for good luck!

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By: mitch4 http://comicsidontunderstand.com/wordpress/your-miscellaneous-comments/#comment-209341 mitch4 Fri, 19 Jan 2018 03:51:59 +0000 http://comicsidontunderstand.com/wordpress/your-miscellaneous-comments/#comment-209341 The tool I was using there is somewhat different from what happens when your web browser or other program needs to convert a domain name or hostname. A program like nslookup (or "host", or "dig") queries a DNS server for you (either the one it defaults to or one you specify) , but there is a more complicated system when a program that actually needs to use the ip address result looks for it. There is a hierarchy of ways it will look, starting on your device itself, where it might have stored in a cache the result from a previous time it wanted to know -- if it has the answer <i> and obtained it from outside not too long ago, so it is not stale,</i> it will go with what it already knows, or thinks it knows. If it has no answer, or the one it has is old enough to count as stale, it will escalate the query to the next in a chain of sources. Next may be a cache on your local access point (in its role as "router", to accept a common misnomer), and then a DNS server specified by your ISP, and then the DNS servers that one looks to as authorities, and so on. At some point an answer is decided on, and gets updated at each step back down the chain. It's a little complicated as described, but that is what makes it a distributed system, and what allows it to function without bogging down the root authorities, as would happen if all queries had to be resolved centrally. That business about using the latest answer you already have, if it is recent enough to not count as stale, typically may be around three days. This is why you sometimes hear that DNS changes can take that long to "propagate". It's not that transmission could actually take that long, but that there is a timeout involved. Nowadays it is generally shorter in practice, but your provider may say three days out of habit or to be safe. And indeed, if your hosting company moves your site, for a while end users looking for www.comicsidontunderstand.com will not know it is at 45.40.157.1 and will be sending their requests to maybe 72.167.183.13 and not get a good result. Again, things have improved over the years, and now the old server is likely to send back a notice of permanently changed address, which will trigger the DNS chain to skip the timeout and force an update. (to be continued) The tool I was using there is somewhat different from what happens when your web browser or other program needs to convert a domain name or hostname. A program like nslookup (or “host”, or “dig”) queries a DNS server for you (either the one it defaults to or one you specify) , but there is a more complicated system when a program that actually needs to use the ip address result looks for it. There is a hierarchy of ways it will look, starting on your device itself, where it might have stored in a cache the result from a previous time it wanted to know — if it has the answer and obtained it from outside not too long ago, so it is not stale, it will go with what it already knows, or thinks it knows. If it has no answer, or the one it has is old enough to count as stale, it will escalate the query to the next in a chain of sources.

Next may be a cache on your local access point (in its role as “router”, to accept a common misnomer), and then a DNS server specified by your ISP, and then the DNS servers that one looks to as authorities, and so on. At some point an answer is decided on, and gets updated at each step back down the chain. It’s a little complicated as described, but that is what makes it a distributed system, and what allows it to function without bogging down the root authorities, as would happen if all queries had to be resolved centrally.

That business about using the latest answer you already have, if it is recent enough to not count as stale, typically may be around three days. This is why you sometimes hear that DNS changes can take that long to “propagate”. It’s not that transmission could actually take that long, but that there is a timeout involved. Nowadays it is generally shorter in practice, but your provider may say three days out of habit or to be safe.

And indeed, if your hosting company moves your site, for a while end users looking for www.comicsidontunderstand.com will not know it is at 45.40.157.1 and will be sending their requests to maybe 72.167.183.13 and not get a good result. Again, things have improved over the years, and now the old server is likely to send back a notice of permanently changed address, which will trigger the DNS chain to skip the timeout and force an update.

(to be continued)

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By: mitch4 http://comicsidontunderstand.com/wordpress/your-miscellaneous-comments/#comment-209340 mitch4 Fri, 19 Jan 2018 03:51:36 +0000 http://comicsidontunderstand.com/wordpress/your-miscellaneous-comments/#comment-209340 I was just going to do a quick and very incomplete primer on DNS. There are many things the Domain Name Service (or System) is used for, but a fundamental part of it is "translating" from a domain name, or hostname in a domain, to the numerical IP address associated with that name. That's necessary for most communications on the internet, because the names aren't really addresses (though people do say "web address" sometimes for a domain + hostname), and most messages or requests need to go somewhere specified by a real address, which is to say, a numerical IP address. In comment 104, Ï was using a user-oriented tool called nslookup to look up the ip addresses for a couple of names. For "www.comicsidontunderstand.com" the answer was "45.40.157.1". (There is other stuff in the command response, mostly about identifying the server that is answering the query.) For " www.thewinnetkaclub.com" the answer was also "45.40.157.1". I could also have asked about a hostname "ip-45-40-157-1.ip.secureserver.net" and the answer would have been that same numerical ip address. There's nothing actually wrong with that. A hosting company like goDaddy can have many customers with different domain names all sitting on one physical server which might have just one IP address. (Also they will have their own name for it, not connected to any client -- like the "ip-45-40-157-1.ip.secureserver.net" in this case.) These are different virtual hosts, or vhosts. If you type either "www.comicsidontunderstand.com" or " www.thewinnetkaclub.com" into a web browser, it will send an http request for a web page in both cases to the same place, IP "45.40.157.1". The names were used to get the IP address, but weren't totally discarded after serving that purpose. The name is sent as part of the request, and the web server software at "45.40.157.1" will use the transmitted name to figure out which customer vhost files to send back. If you plug in just the numerical 45.40.157.1, or the hosting company's native name for ther server "ip-45-40-157-1.ip.secureserver.net", into the location bar of the web browser, what happens? It just depends on what their setup is. In this case -- give it a try. Whoa! I get The Winnetka Club. That means they are sort of the most-favored child -- the default vhost. (to be continued) I was just going to do a quick and very incomplete primer on DNS.

There are many things the Domain Name Service (or System) is used for, but a fundamental part of it is “translating” from a domain name, or hostname in a domain, to the numerical IP address associated with that name. That’s necessary for most communications on the internet, because the names aren’t really addresses (though people do say “web address” sometimes for a domain + hostname), and most messages or requests need to go somewhere specified by a real address, which is to say, a numerical IP address.

In comment 104, Ï was using a user-oriented tool called nslookup to look up the ip addresses for a couple of names. For “www.comicsidontunderstand.com” the answer was “45.40.157.1″. (There is other stuff in the command response, mostly about identifying the server that is answering the query.) For ” www.thewinnetkaclub.com” the answer was also “45.40.157.1″. I could also have asked about a hostname “ip-45-40-157-1.ip.secureserver.net” and the answer would have been that same numerical ip address.

There’s nothing actually wrong with that. A hosting company like goDaddy can have many customers with different domain names all sitting on one physical server which might have just one IP address. (Also they will have their own name for it, not connected to any client — like the “ip-45-40-157-1.ip.secureserver.net” in this case.) These are different virtual hosts, or vhosts.

If you type either “www.comicsidontunderstand.com” or ” www.thewinnetkaclub.com” into a web browser, it will send an http request for a web page in both cases to the same place, IP “45.40.157.1″. The names were used to get the IP address, but weren’t totally discarded after serving that purpose. The name is sent as part of the request, and the web server software at “45.40.157.1″ will use the transmitted name to figure out which customer vhost files to send back.

If you plug in just the numerical 45.40.157.1, or the hosting company’s native name for ther server “ip-45-40-157-1.ip.secureserver.net”, into the location bar of the web browser, what happens? It just depends on what their setup is. In this case — give it a try. Whoa! I get The Winnetka Club. That means they are sort of the most-favored child — the default vhost.

(to be continued)

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By: Brian in STL http://comicsidontunderstand.com/wordpress/your-miscellaneous-comments/#comment-209338 Brian in STL Thu, 18 Jan 2018 23:05:24 +0000 http://comicsidontunderstand.com/wordpress/your-miscellaneous-comments/#comment-209338 I had been a devoted usenet participant for a number of years, up until mid-September of 2011. At that time, I got a new computer at home, and decided not to set up a newsreader. More or less a cold-turkey stoppage. I did drop into rec.arts.sf.written on occasion via Google Groups to ask for reading recommendations. I started looking at usenet groups again about a year or so ago. It was really surprising, even shocking, how much the traffic had declined. RACS had always been fairly low-traffic, but there was a dedicated core. Now there's almost nothing. A couple of guys like to track which which comics are in reruns/reuse. RASFW was a high-traffic group when I left, although it always had a large portion of that was off-topic crap. Now the traffic is low and the off-topic crap is almost all of it. Right now I follow RACS and RASFW via Google Groups and that's it. I will be retiring from Megacorp here in a few weeks, and I haven't decided whether to up my participation in usenet or not. At its peak, there wasn't anything like it and there hasn't been since. Probably reddit is as close as you get to centralized discussion on a wide range of topics. I miss fun little groups like alt.fan.tom-servo. They were kind of the canaries in the coal mine. When those began dropping below critical mass, I knew things were turning. Today, some are doing . . . okay I guess. But it's kind of like the mall where a few stores that face out to the parking lot are in business, but the interior is a ghost-town. The future ain't bright. I had been a devoted usenet participant for a number of years, up until mid-September of 2011. At that time, I got a new computer at home, and decided not to set up a newsreader. More or less a cold-turkey stoppage. I did drop into rec.arts.sf.written on occasion via Google Groups to ask for reading recommendations.

I started looking at usenet groups again about a year or so ago. It was really surprising, even shocking, how much the traffic had declined.

RACS had always been fairly low-traffic, but there was a dedicated core. Now there’s almost nothing. A couple of guys like to track which which comics are in reruns/reuse.

RASFW was a high-traffic group when I left, although it always had a large portion of that was off-topic crap. Now the traffic is low and the off-topic crap is almost all of it.

Right now I follow RACS and RASFW via Google Groups and that’s it. I will be retiring from Megacorp here in a few weeks, and I haven’t decided whether to up my participation in usenet or not. At its peak, there wasn’t anything like it and there hasn’t been since. Probably reddit is as close as you get to centralized discussion on a wide range of topics.

I miss fun little groups like alt.fan.tom-servo. They were kind of the canaries in the coal mine. When those began dropping below critical mass, I knew things were turning. Today, some are doing . . . okay I guess. But it’s kind of like the mall where a few stores that face out to the parking lot are in business, but the interior is a ghost-town. The future ain’t bright.

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