Anything here other than the fact that “people” and “papal” sound similar?

Cidu Bill on Oct 16th 2017

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Filed in Argyle Sweater, Bill Bickel, CIDU, Scott Hilburn, comic strips, comics, humor | 39 responses so far

39 Responses to “Anything here other than the fact that “people” and “papal” sound similar?”

  1. furrykef Oct 16th 2017 at 12:59 am 1

    Nope.

  2. Cidu Bill Oct 16th 2017 at 01:02 am 2

    Should this have a Geezer tag?

  3. Seth Oct 16th 2017 at 01:43 am 3

    But, to be true to the original, the Purple Papal Eater should only be eating a purple papal.

  4. James Pollock Oct 16th 2017 at 02:14 am 4

    “Should this have a Geezer tag?”

    Young people, at least theoretically, are eligible to be pope, too, AFAIK…

  5. Kilby Oct 16th 2017 at 03:04 am 5

    After recently enduring one of the “Alvin & the Chipmunks” movies with my kids, I decided they needed to hear the “Witch Doctor” song; the next track after it on the YouTube playlist just happened to be the “Flying Purple People Eater”. Both are still funny, but definitely worth a geezer tag.

  6. Stan Oct 16th 2017 at 04:10 am 6

    Dooo-dooo-doo-doo! Stop! Grammar time!

    If this was a ‘papal eater’, wouldn’t it be eating LIKE a pope rather than eating popes. Papal is an adjective, is it not?

  7. DemetriosX Oct 16th 2017 at 05:31 am 7

    If they stopped electing purple popes, they wouldn’t have this problem.

  8. Pete Oct 16th 2017 at 05:59 am 8

    It might have been funnier if the Pope was the monster, and call it a Papal people eater.

  9. Stan Oct 16th 2017 at 06:47 am 9

    Pete, I completely agree. Nice one! I’ll bet the cartoonist thought of that, but then thought better of it in the end. I suspect in a family newspaper in the US, people would be more likely to lose their minds over cartoonists mocking their religion than to nearly anything else. I believe people take that pope stuff pretty seriously, and although he’s the basis of the humour in this comic, he’s the victim. Drawing him with one eye, one horn and flying while eating people may rattle some cages.

    Although, eating people…the Eucharist? Maybe it’s not that far a leap after all.

  10. chuckers Oct 16th 2017 at 07:24 am 10

    There was at one time a shaggy dog pun story that ended up like this but it involved a disabled air force pilot that developed a diseased that turned him violet. I don’t recall all the details but I think he tried to get the pope to heal him but failed which turned him into a one-eyed, one-armed, flying purple Papal hater.

  11. Kilby Oct 16th 2017 at 08:41 am 11

    @ Stan (9) - Irrationally extreme reactions to religious satire are unfortunately not limited to America, nor to Christianity in general: “Je suis Charlie (Hebdo)“.

  12. padraig Oct 16th 2017 at 09:08 am 12

    Would have been funnier if the Pope had been wearing an itsy bitsy teeny weeny yellow polka dot bikini.

  13. MikeK Oct 16th 2017 at 11:26 am 13

    I don’t get the part about dropping the hat.

  14. Cidu Bill Oct 16th 2017 at 11:36 am 14

    Me neither, MikeK.

  15. Kilby Oct 16th 2017 at 11:59 am 15

    @ MikeK (13) - The decorative mitre is the most prominent identifying feature of the Pope. Without it, he might be able to pass himself off as an ordinary bishop. There is a parallel in military combat dress: in some battlegrounds, officers avoided helmets that would identify them as such, because it made them prime targets for snipers.

  16. Bob Oct 16th 2017 at 12:07 pm 16

    I haven’t checked on the average time to elect a subsequent pope, but I doubt the conclave (or some other collective noun?) of Cardinals would be able to agree on two new popes within a single month.

  17. Cidu Bill Oct 16th 2017 at 12:22 pm 17

    They agreed on two popes in a month and a half back in 1978, didn’t they?

  18. mitch4 Oct 16th 2017 at 01:11 pm 18

    But choosing the papal name for the replacement guy that time was easy. :-)

  19. DemetriosX Oct 16th 2017 at 02:29 pm 19

    They probably want him to drop the hat so they can reuse it. It takes time and money to get those things together, so their costs have been going up dramatically.

    It’s probably easier to elect a new pope very shortly after an election than it is after a few years. There hasn’t been much change in the list of potential candidates (other than getting shorter), there are already established camps and the only real effort is winning over the adherents of the short-timer. They can probably do away with a lot of the preliminary politicking and get straight to heart of the matter.

  20. Mona Oct 16th 2017 at 03:04 pm 20

    My first thought on “drop the hat” was so they could re-use it. Like a pageant crown being passed on to the next person.

  21. fleabane Oct 16th 2017 at 03:14 pm 21

    “Anything here other than the fact that “people” and “papal” sound similar?”

    Isn’t that enough? I got a chuckle out of it. It’s a pun and as far as sounds go a fair one (albeit grammatically incorrect).

  22. Wendy Oct 16th 2017 at 03:15 pm 22

    Well, it made me laugh, but I like puns. Dropping the hat is probably so the next pope can use it, rather than disguise, IMO. Now I’m going to have to break out my “Funky Favorites” record. Though I usually do about this time of year because of “Monster Mash”. (Sorry, I’m pretty sure only one of those is supposed to be in quotes, and I’m not sure how the other is supposed to be designated, and I’m not sure which is which. Like I said, I’m a math person.)

  23. Brian in STL Oct 16th 2017 at 05:19 pm 23

    From the wisdom of Philip J. Fry: “My folks were always on me to groom myself and wear underpants. What am I, the Pope?”

  24. James Pollock Oct 16th 2017 at 06:21 pm 24

    “I haven’t checked on the average time to elect a subsequent pope, but I doubt the conclave (or some other collective noun?) of Cardinals would be able to agree on two new popes within a single month.”

    Surely a major factor in that length of deliberations is the fact that Bishop of Rome is a lifetime appointment. Make it a two-week gig, and the deliberations probably would be expected to go much faster.

  25. James Pollock Oct 16th 2017 at 06:58 pm 25

    “Sorry, I’m pretty sure only one of those is supposed to be in quotes”

    Whether or not something is “supposed” to be in quotes depends on the style guide you’re adhering to at the time. Different academic disciplines have their own style guides for things intended to be published in academic journals, journalists have the AP style guide, although some publications make their own alterations to the SP guide. Back in the days when I was working on publications for Nintendo, everything I wrote was supposed to be in 8-year-olds’ vocabulary, because that was the bottom end of their assumed audience. (Fortunately, this wasn’t too hard back then. What does this button do? Shoot. What does this button do? Jump. What does this button do? Pause. What does this button do? Nothing. And that’s all the buttons there are. The hardest part was that there was no universally-accepted term for the big + shaped button (which could be summarized as “move”, usually). Eventually, “directional pad” won out, or rather, the shortened “D Pad” did.)

  26. Mark in Boston Oct 16th 2017 at 08:25 pm 26

    Normally a joke involving putting puns in a phrase like “flying purple people eater” tries to put in as many puns as possible, not just one. Thus we get “transporting gulls across a staid lion for immortal porpoises” and “two obese Patties, Special Ross, Lester G’s picking bunions on a Sesame Street bus” and “super calloused fragile mystic hexed by halitosis.” A single pun in a four-word phrase is a disappointment.

  27. Bob Oct 16th 2017 at 08:50 pm 27

    CIDU Bill @17 - a National Catholic Register article from 2013 states the length of a conclave has varied from a few hours to just over 1000 days. It also notes that since 1846, conclaves have taken between 2 and 5 days. However, the time between Pope Paul VI’s death and Pope John Paul’s election was 20 days (and 18 days between JP and JP2), so it seems it takes a while to get the conclave convened.

    Though, if the cardinals were aware of the flying papal people eater, they’d likely be on alert to quickly convene and elect. (Then again, there might be a few more popes who would decide they didn’t want to fulfill the lifetime term.)

  28. Cidu Bill Oct 16th 2017 at 10:00 pm 28

    I imagine if the cardinals were aware of the flying papal people eater, they’d always choose a runner-up pope.

  29. Boise Ed Oct 17th 2017 at 02:12 am 29

    Wendy [22]: The greater entity, such as a book or LP title, gets italics and the lesser entity, such as a short story or song title, gets quotation marks. Back in typewriter days, when italics weren’t an option, underlining was the substitute. (On a newspaper, the Linotype operator would set any underlined copy in italics.)

  30. Meryl A Oct 17th 2017 at 02:17 am 30

    I thought that archbishops are the ones that wear purple.

  31. Meryl A Oct 17th 2017 at 02:28 am 31

    Kilby -

    In the American Revolution when the soldiers lined up against each other with their muskets, the muskets could not really be aimed with any accuracy - the musket is smooth bore and the ball would bounce around inside the barrel and depending on the final bounce was the direction it went (yes, they all went towards the other soldiers, but one would not necessarily hit the soldier one was aiming at) - they basically put out a lot of lead and hopefully hit someone on the other side.

    Rifles, however could be aimed with accuracy. European armies did not use riflemen. But Washington did. He would have them dress in hunting shirt/frock and keep them on the sides. Their job was to kill the officers, so officers were terribly afraid of them.

    Aside - Why not use rifles for everyone then? Muskets were a military weapon - due to the smooth bore they could be “quickly” reloaded. A good soldier could reload 3 times a minute. On the other hand the rifle was a hunting/personal gun. The ball has to be pushed through the rifling inside the barrel, so it takes much longer to load the rifle.

    Muskets are loaded with a cartridge - ball and powder in a paper tube - rip open with your teeth (if one did not have any place in their mouth with opposing teeth - off to the artillery) , pour a bit of powder in the breach, then ram the rest of the cartridge down the barrel.

    Rifles are loaded by pouring a bit of powder from a powder horn into a measure and same is poured into the breach. Then the powder is measured and poured down the barrel. Then the ball is “patched” (wrapped in a small piece of cloth) and forced down the barrel and through the rifling.

    I have live fired husband’s musket at a range. I did not like it, but somehow managed to hit the target in the 2nd circle from the center.

  32. fleabane Oct 17th 2017 at 11:14 am 32

    “Normally a joke involving putting puns in a phrase like “flying purple people eater” tries to put in as many puns as possible, not just one.”

    Not really. It depends on the natural flow and syntax and concept of the pun. Those ones you quote are “set-ups”. The situation described is so specific and strange that one knows it is going somewhere but you have no idea where but you have to clues to guess. ANd part of the joke is how tortured it is.

    An honest pun has just a simple pun but it slides in naturally. This is a perfectly fine one.

  33. Mark in Boston Oct 17th 2017 at 08:24 pm 33

    “The situation described is so specific and strange that one knows it is going somewhere”

    That’s exactly how I feel about this cartoon. There’s something very specific and very strange here.

  34. Kilby Oct 17th 2017 at 10:29 pm 34

    @ Boise Ed (29) - Standard printed notation always depends on what ican be managed with existing (common) technology. The German rules for replacing “Umlauts” (äöü) with “vowel+E” are based on the fact that umlauts are not always possible (or easy) to produce. Similarly, although it is possible to use “italics” in a Wordpress comment, it is not easy, so it’s perfectly normal to use “quotes” as a replacement. Underlining isn’t an option here: the notation is just as difficult as for italics, but I’ve never been able to get it to work in Wordpress.

    P.S. Back in college, our physics (and math) professors had us change the standard handwritten notation for vectors. In high school, most of us had learned to put a little arrow over the vector’s name (usually a single letter). The “new” handwritten form was to place a wavy line under the letter. The reason for this was that in typesetting, the wavy line is the standard signal for bold, and that is the way that vectors are normally distinguished in published scientific text.

  35. fleabane Oct 18th 2017 at 02:05 am 35

    Mark in Boston.

    Fair enough. I think it scans just fine and is simple enough to flow naturally for me to call it “a decent pun”. I won’t go so far as to say it a memorable or particularly noteworthy one.

    I guess I consider “One-eyed, one-horned flying purple people eater” to be a single concept phrase rather than a eight-word phrase so “people/papal” is good enough.

    Not great though….

  36. billybob Oct 18th 2017 at 03:12 am 36

    he’s worried they’ll run out of hats?

  37. Mark in Boston Oct 18th 2017 at 07:54 pm 37

    It could have been a papal people eater, eating papal people. But only one at a time, as the Pope is the only papal person available at any one time.

    A purple Paypal eater or a purple pimple eater would have been just as funny.

  38. James Pollock Oct 18th 2017 at 09:17 pm 38

    “It could have been a papal people eater, eating papal people. But only one at a time, as the Pope is the only papal person available at any one time.”

    There’s a case to be made that any members of the Pope’s Church are “papal people”.

  39. Mark in Boston Oct 19th 2017 at 11:48 pm 39

    Fair enough, in that “papal” can mean “being the Pope” or “belonging to the Pope” or “associated with the Pope”.

    So a “papal eater” could just be an eater belonging to the Pope, in other words the Pope’s pet.

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