Presumably Janis doesn’t really suspect raccoons and Arlo knows it, but beyond that I got nothing

Cidu Bill on Oct 11th 2017

raccoon.JPG

Filed in Arlo and Janis, Bill Bickel, CIDU, Jimmy Johnson, comic strips, comics, humor | 35 responses so far

35 Responses to “Presumably Janis doesn’t really suspect raccoons and Arlo knows it, but beyond that I got nothing”

  1. Chip Oct 11th 2017 at 10:55 am 1

    Arlo was hoping for a witty comeback be he also got nothing.

  2. Daniel J. Drazen Oct 11th 2017 at 11:02 am 2

    The cat is the only one who believes the “raccoon” cover story, and being part of the crew he’s supposed to know better.

  3. Kedamono Oct 11th 2017 at 11:22 am 3

    I wonder if Arlo is making an obscure “Pinky and the Brain” reference?

  4. r2t Oct 11th 2017 at 11:39 am 4

    never underestimate the resourcefulness of raccoons! I bet Arlo was framed! j.k.

  5. Mona Oct 11th 2017 at 12:34 pm 5

    Janis was making a joke. Arlo probably got up during the night to snack on some chicken and shared it with Ludwig the cat. Raccoons have been known to raid chicken coops at night.
    And Arlo is reassuring Ludwig that raccoons have not been in the house. My kitty gets distressed when she is looking out the window and sees the raccoons on the back deck. They are bigger than she is and could cause harm to her. (The babies are so darn cute, though!) I assure her that she is safe in the house and they will not come inside.

  6. DemetriosX Oct 11th 2017 at 01:11 pm 6

    Yeah, notice that Luddy is somewhat freaked out in the last panel. Arlo is just reminding him that it was the two of them.

    And yes, raccoons can really mess up a cat. When I was a kid we had a cat that barely survived a raccoon encounter. A group of raccoons also once convinced my parents and a couple of cops that we had a mountain lion in our back yard.

  7. James Pollock Oct 11th 2017 at 01:13 pm 7

    By opening with the raccoon “theory”, Janis is signaling that she’s prepared to accept any halfway plausible story that explains where the leftovers have gone to other than Arlo’s eaten them. All Arlo needs is a halfway plausible cover story, and he’s in the clear. His brain, however, cannot come up with an even halfway plausible lie when he needs it.

  8. Wendy Oct 11th 2017 at 03:31 pm 8

    kedamono, that’s where my brain went upon reading the last panel. If that’s not what the author intended, I’m not sure what he did mean. And yes, the guilty look on Arlo’s face in panel 3 clearly means he ate it, and she knows it.

  9. Brian in STL Oct 11th 2017 at 04:09 pm 9

    I agree with “reminding the cat that it wasn’t raccoons because we et the chicken.”

  10. James Pollock Oct 11th 2017 at 04:39 pm 10

    “I agree with “reminding the cat that it wasn’t raccoons because we et the chicken.””

    I think the cat is just there, and has nothing to do with the joke at all. Arlo is not talking to Luddie in panel 4. He’s talking to himself. If the cat weren’t there, it would make no difference.

    Janis knows it wasn’t Luddie… she’d have been mad at him in panel 1 if she thought he’d gotten into food that wasn’t meant for him.

    As for whether or not cats are a-scared of raccoons, the answer is “not necessarily”. I’ve seen a cat take on a black bear. There’s a viral video of a cat that challenges, and chases away, the dog who was mauling a little boy. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JRhV8YoEUqA

  11. Brent Oct 11th 2017 at 05:57 pm 11

    Lugwig is definitely important to that last panel… his tail is making a very definite response to the news of raccoons. It at least adds that as a side joke, but I also think he’s talking to Luddie there.

    I’m thinking that if it isn’t a Pinky and the Brain reference, then Arlo is just referring to Luddie as the brains of this operation. Apparently he was doing what cat’s do… looking for a handout and leading Arlo to the fridge where chicken was discovered and the operation came to fruition.

  12. James Pollock Oct 11th 2017 at 06:47 pm 12

    “I’m thinking that if it isn’t a Pinky and the Brain reference, then Arlo is just referring to Luddie as the brains of this operation.”

    He’s talking to himself, and referring to the major brain misfire he suffered in panel 3.

  13. Mark in Boston Oct 11th 2017 at 09:36 pm 13

    I remember one where Janis is sitting in the living room, reading, and a raccoon walks across the scene. Janis watches it and then says “I KNOW he’s up to something!”

  14. guero Oct 11th 2017 at 10:53 pm 14

    Arlo is always talking to Luddie. Apparently cats aren’t good at picking up on sarcasm, and Arlo is reassuring him, although with a little sarcasm of his own.

  15. Olivier Oct 12th 2017 at 05:35 am 15

    Arlo/Pinky: Gee, Brain, what do you want to do tonight?
    Luddie/Brain: The same thing we do every night, Pinky - try to take over the [fridge]!

  16. ja Oct 12th 2017 at 09:14 am 16

    I’m with Daniel/Mona/DemetriosX et al: Janis is sarcastically chiding Arlo for raiding the leftover chicken (which he shared with Luddie). Luddie’s big eyes and fluffed tail are evidence that he is freaked out by the idea of raccoons in the house. Arlo reminds Luddie that they were the ones who ate the chicken. The “brain” reference is sarcasm directed at Luddie’s gullibility.

  17. Mitch4 Oct 12th 2017 at 10:40 am 17

    Yes, especially since the “BRAIN“ comment is written in a special way, which I take as the hand-lettering approximation of italics.

  18. James Pollock Oct 12th 2017 at 12:26 pm 18

    “Arlo/Pinky: Gee, Brain, what do you want to do tonight?
    Luddie/Brain: The same thing we do every night, Pinky - try to take over the [fridge]!”

    Luddie/Brain: Are you thinking what I’m thinking, Pinky?
    Arlo/Pinky: I think so, Brain, but how will we keep the raccoons from coming back and raiding the fridge?

  19. Brian in STL Oct 12th 2017 at 04:12 pm 19

    “I think the cat is just there, and has nothing to do with the joke at all. Arlo is not talking to Luddie in panel 4. He’s talking to himself. If the cat weren’t there, it would make no difference.”

    I’m going to disagree on that. Arlo is reacting to the cat’s reaction to the thought of raccoons. Why would Arlo need to remind himself?

    “Janis knows it wasn’t Luddie… she’d have been mad at him in panel 1 if she thought he’d gotten into food that wasn’t meant for him.”

    While the cat might not have initiated the raid, it was a participant.

  20. James Pollock Oct 12th 2017 at 11:27 pm 20

    “Arlo is reacting to the cat’s reaction to the thought of raccoons.”

    Except why would the cat be reacting to the thought of raccoons? There aren’t any raccoons.

  21. Carolyn Oct 13th 2017 at 12:16 am 21

    Maybe it’s because my fridge died and we were out looking for a new one tonight, but I thought Janis was rummaging in a cabinet because there’s no such thing as a pink refrigerator.

  22. James Pollock Oct 13th 2017 at 01:15 am 22

    “there’s no such thing as a pink refrigerator.”

    Seeing is believing…

    https://www.google.com/search?tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1280&bih=831&q=pink+refrigerator&oq=pink+refrigerator

  23. Kilby Oct 13th 2017 at 04:01 am 23

    After looking at the text very closely, I think Mitch4 is correct @17: it’s exceptionally uniform, but it seems that it really is hand-lettered, and not a computer font.

  24. Terrence Feenstra Oct 13th 2017 at 06:48 am 24

    Daniel @2 is correct right out of the box. And ja @16 provides an excellent summary of the setup and subsequent action.

  25. Ted from Ft. Laud Oct 13th 2017 at 04:25 pm 25

    Carolyn - it might be that you can’t get a pink refrigerator now (aside from custom panels or skins), but if you are old enough, you certainly remember them (predating the 1970s’ harvest gold and avocado take over). In the 1960s (and going back to the 1950s) pink was a popular appliance color - in Florida at least it was often called “coral” - along with turquoise (generally “aqua” in Florida). I remember entire kitchens done in aqua and pink. I’m led to believe that turquoise is having a bit of a comeback in retro design circles - not sure about pink/coral.

  26. mitch4 Oct 13th 2017 at 05:40 pm 26

    Ted, are you going to tell me that the years I spent trying to learn to distinguish turquoise from aquamarine were a total waste? Aaayyyrrgghh!

  27. James Pollock Oct 13th 2017 at 08:58 pm 27

    Speaking as a male person, mitch, I can say with some authority that there are only about 15 different colors, and anything or anyone that suggests there are more than that is just part of a massive conspiracy of the Crayola corporation.

  28. Mark in Boston Oct 13th 2017 at 10:20 pm 28

    Anyone who says there are thousands of different colors probably also says that there are thousands of different notes in an octave.

  29. Kilby Oct 14th 2017 at 10:23 am 29

    Here’s a classic commentary on color names from Doghouse Diaries (the original website doesn’t work, so the link is filched from elsewhere).

  30. Olivier Oct 16th 2017 at 03:09 am 30

    Kilby @29 : the girl side also works for philatelists.

  31. Brian in STL Oct 16th 2017 at 05:44 pm 31

    I once read that the ancient Romans didn’t consider gray to be a distinct color, but rather a shade of green.

  32. mitch4 Oct 16th 2017 at 06:06 pm 32

    The relationship between orange and brown was a complete surprise to me.

  33. Kilby Oct 16th 2017 at 11:56 pm 33

    @ mitch4 (32) - The link between yellow and brown is even closer.
    When working with pigments(*), the primary colors are red, blue, and yellow: blue+yellow=green, and red+green=brown. It’s different with light(*): the primary colors are red, blue, and green, and red+green=yellow.
    This relationship was easy to demonstrate with early PC color monitors, for which the “RGB” controller provided one bit each for red, green, and blue, plus a fourth bit for intensity (brightness). Activating the red and green bits produced a brown pixel if the brightness bit was off, turning brightness on changed the pixel’s color to yellow.
    (*) Pigments subtract all wavelengths except for the color they reflect. Light provides the color directly, so the colors add, rather than subtract.

  34. Meryl A Oct 17th 2017 at 03:13 am 34

    I thought there were 8 colors - I had the cheap box of crayons when I was a kid.

    My dad used to have a pencil that he told me wrote any color - of course he would write the name of the color I said. One day I said turquoise. After that the magic pencil wrote any color but turquoise as he could not spell same.

    Colors vary by the person. I recently was stitching a tiny embroidery piece which was started several years ago. It was a free pattern from DMC threads to help sell their new (at the time) Memory Thread. I was reading the directions and it says to use peach cotton perle and peach memory thread for the vase - ummm, looks more like gold to me.

    Mom had the pink refrigerator when they bought a house. The next door neighbor had blue. By the time we got married it was yellow or green. By the time we bought one we were able to get it in sensible white - both we have bought have been white.

  35. James Pollock Oct 17th 2017 at 04:09 am 35

    “This relationship was easy to demonstrate with early PC color monitors, for which the ‘RGB’ controller provided one bit each for red, green, and blue, plus a fourth bit for intensity (brightness). ”

    If you’re speaking specifically about the PC (as opposed to other types of computers), there are several standards which could be considered “early”.

    There were the modes supported by the Color Graphics Array (CGA), the modes supported by the PCjr, and the modes supported by the Enhanced Graphics Array (EGA). All of these were included with the shiny new Video Graphics Array and Multicolor Graphics Array capabilities of the PS/2 line of computers, first available in 1987. MCGA was subsumed into “VGA” compatible and later “Super VGA” display adapters by other manufacturers. (By which I mean MCGA modes were included in these new cards’ capabilities, but nobody bothered to mention MCGA compatability by name.) The VGA also had a monochrome mode as well as the color mode… with 64 shades of gray, which pretty much nobody wanted.)

    The CGA had a couple of possible hardware implementations, one of which didn’t involve having an RGB monitor. The highest resolution possible with CGA was 640×200, but at that resolution there were only two colors available, black or (color of phospors in your monitor, typically green or amber), and the biggest palette of colors was limited to 320×200… in which case you could have four different colors on the screen at once. Both the PCjr and EGA added higher color depth (16 colors on screen at once!) and the EGA added a 640×350 resolution.
    In CGA, there were two common palettes… cyan, magenta, white, and black was one, and red, green, brown, and black was the other. These could be easily switched by a casual user without having to have any understanding of how to directly program the video hardware. These were the same whether you were using a CGA card’s RGB output or the composite output (An RGB monitor got it’s name not from its abilities to show red, green, and blue, but because the signals for each of those colors was sent separately to an RGB monitor, but were all joined together into one signal for composite monitors.)

    My first PC had a CGA card in it, to which I hooked up a monochrome composite monitor. So I didn’t have cyan, magenta, white, and black… I had orange, slightly less orange, substantially less orange, and black. I eventually upgraded that computer with an EGA card and monitor, so I could play games in 16 colors.

    When I worked in the computer game industry in 1989, we supported PC’s with Hercules monochrome graphics adapters, CGA, EGA, VGA, or Tandy’s non-standardized-except-for-Tandy 16-color mode. We even tested with a VGA monochrome monitor, which was important, because a color scheme that made for readable text on a color background in VGA color often turned into text indistinguishable from the background in VGA monochrome.

    For sound hardware, we supported the basic PC speaker (that one that beeps once when your computer starts up), Adlib sound card, and again a Tandy system that wasn’t standardized. We had a switch on the speaker in the test computer that didn’t have any sound hardware in it, because PC speaker sounds for a videogame is mind-numbingly annoying for everyone in the room about two minutes in. In retrospect, we really, REALLY should have killed the music and just played sound effects, but that’s not what they did… they tried to play both through the PC speaker.
    The PC wasn’t yet a strong gaming computer… the Amiga was king, and in Europe, the Atari ST was a strong contender. Then Creative Labs brought out the Sound Blaster and change was afoot.

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