Color

Cidu Bill on Jul 8th 2017

Yeah, you’ll have to scroll some. Thank whoever redesigned the GoComics pages to make life difficult for me.

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Filed in Bill Bickel, Buni, CIDU, Ryan Pagelow, comic strips, comics, humor | 17 responses so far

17 Responses to “Color”

  1. Arthur Jul 8th 2017 at 07:22 pm 1

    Bunni brought color into their drab lives. They couldn’t deal
    with it.

  2. Mitch4 Jul 8th 2017 at 07:45 pm 2

    Hmm, creepy!

  3. Kilby Jul 8th 2017 at 07:45 pm 3

    The irony being that Buni’s chromatic power affects only others, and not himself.

  4. Ron Jul 8th 2017 at 07:53 pm 4

    Buni visits Pleasantville.

  5. Arthur Jul 8th 2017 at 08:43 pm 5

    I also thought of Pleasantville, but there some of the people
    embraced the color.

  6. Cidu Bill Jul 8th 2017 at 11:13 pm 6

    Pleasantville: the worst movie ever made out of fantastic trailer.

  7. Arthur Jul 8th 2017 at 11:23 pm 7

    Pleasantville: the worst movie ever made out of fantastic trailer.

    I liked Pleasantville. Chacun a son gout.

    I saw The Last Starfighter based on a trailer. I’m glad I did,
    but the scene that persuaded me to see the movie wasn’t in the
    movie.

  8. fleabane Jul 9th 2017 at 03:07 am 8

    They are racist and always thought they hated orange colored bears? Color has acidic properties and it dissolved their hands down to the wrists?

  9. Pinny Jul 9th 2017 at 03:11 am 9

    Re: CIDU Bill [6]
    I could not have expressed my thoughts about that movie any better. Thank you.

    Re this comic:
    Color is a contaminant/germ/sickness in this world. The CDC had to come and take these contaminated characters away.

  10. Pete Jul 9th 2017 at 01:55 pm 10

  11. Kilby Jul 10th 2017 at 04:19 am 11

    @ Pete (10) - There’s a certain amount of irony in reading that strip from a monochromatic archive. Here’s the original version in color.

  12. JHGRedekop Jul 10th 2017 at 03:41 pm 12

    The YouTube video asdfmovie7 did this gag about four years ago: https://youtu.be/5xniR1GN69U?t=1m19s

  13. CaroZ Jul 10th 2017 at 04:34 pm 13

    If you had lived your entire life in greyscale, and suddenly one day everything turned color (something you literally had no concept of) you wouldn’t instantly find it bright and cheery and wonderful. You’d be terrified.

  14. James Pollock Jul 10th 2017 at 06:15 pm 14

    “If you had lived your entire life in greyscale, and suddenly one day everything turned color (something you literally had no concept of) you wouldn’t instantly find it bright and cheery and wonderful. You’d be terrified.”

    Infrared and ultraviolet are there now. Being able to see into the infrared spectrum isn’t scary. Being able to see in the ultraviolet spectrum is only terrifying if you happen to be in a hotel room, sitting on the bedspread.

    The local bowling alley does “night bowling” under ultraviolet lighting. Way, way, back in my lost youth, the roller-skating venue used to periodically switch to ultraviolet lighting. I don’t recall any terror.

    Or are you suggesting that it isn’t the change in spectrum that causes terror, but merely the change?

  15. Winter Wallaby Jul 10th 2017 at 07:21 pm 15

    JP #13: Human’s don’t ever see infrared or ultraviolet light. Humans can use devices that convert infrared or ultraviolet light to something in the visible spectrum for humans to interpret. Or they can use ultraviolet light to detect things that they would not have been otherwise able to detect. But that’s different than seeing infrared or ultraviolet light itself. I don’t know how I would process it if I suddenly started seeing a new color - e.g. “squirkimuffle” - that I had never seen of or hear of before.

    CaroZ has it, seeing colors if you had no concept of colors before would be terrifying. I actually thought this comic was pretty good.

  16. James Pollock Jul 10th 2017 at 09:27 pm 16

    “seeing colors if you had no concept of colors before would be terrifying.”

    I don’t think it would, because I don’t think you’d even know it was happening. You’d spend a great deal of time learning how to use it.

    Now, some people DO respond to new things with terror, but I don’t think it’s universal.

    There is a fairly small pool of people who have suddenly gained senses they didn’t have before, while also possessed of an adult brain capable of sharing its experiences and impressions (we ALL went through a phase of suddenly gaining sight, but our infant brains don’t retain.

    But there are people who were, say, born blind, grew up, and then a treatment became available that worked. Not a lot of terror reported amongst these cases, to the best of my knowledge. In the late 1800’s, scientists learned of the varying unseen radiations… some of which, the ionizing ones, doing actual damage to their health… but they were excited by this, not terrified, because that’s the way scientists think. Of course, that’s intellectual discovery, not perceptual, so it may not really be comparable, but I think it is.

    I just have the ordinary ROYGBIV visual range, but I sometimes see things that terrify me. A couple of weeks ago, I was in the shed in my backyard, and I disturbed a garter snake. That thing freaked me out despite being less than 3 feet long and not dangerous in any way except for the excessive number of heartbeats over the next 5 minutes or so. It’s the “that’s not what I expected to see” part, not the way I saw it. (TV and movie “jump scares” tend not to work on me, with two exceptions: The end of the original Friday the 13th movie, when the last survivor is in the boat on the lake, and in Creepshow, during the section with Leslie Neilson and Ted Danson. (These are both over 35 years old, so if you got spoiled, um, darn?) On the other hand, reading “The Puppet Masters” left me jumpy for weeks, and so did “Who Goes There?”, and there was a Larry Niven short about people who go out by themselves in the fog. YMMV.

  17. Christine Jul 11th 2017 at 10:31 pm 17

    One wouldn’t expect to see the same reactions to “this treatment did what I expected/hoped” and “the world is suddenly different”.

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