I do not think that word means what Stahler thinks it means

Cidu Bill on Feb 8th 2013

playgroup.gif

Filed in Jeff Stahler, Moderately Confused, comic strips, comics, humor | 20 responses so far

20 Responses to “I do not think that word means what Stahler thinks it means”

  1. AMC Feb 8th 2013 at 01:15 pm 1

    Maybe we’re supposed to understand it in a Broadway?

  2. Judge Mental Feb 8th 2013 at 02:13 pm 2

    I am not sure what you are questioning here. Is there another meaning of playgroup with which neither Stahler nor I am familiar? (or did I completely misinterpret the word in question)

    The only slight misfire I see that “playgroups” are typically kids that are only coming together for the purpose of playing, and these two kids appear to be *already* together. I can sort of forgive that because if the hostess had said, for example, “how many in your party” it derails an already weak joke.

  3. James Pollock Feb 8th 2013 at 02:18 pm 3

    Playgroup
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Playgroup may refer to:
    Pre-school playgroup, a kind of pre-school care
    Playgroup (band), a British dance act
    Playgroup (events), arts and entertainment events in England

  4. Carl Feb 8th 2013 at 03:39 pm 4

    The joke isn’t misunderstanding “playgroup”, it’s the bizarre presence of a fancy restaurant’s maitre d’hotel at a childcare center.

  5. Judge Mental Feb 8th 2013 at 03:58 pm 5

    @Carl #4

    I agree that is the joke. This one isn’t even labeled as a “CIDU” (but does have “moderately confused”.) I am trying to figure out Bill’s caption of “I do not think that word means what Stahler thinks it means”.

  6. Cidu Bill Feb 8th 2013 at 04:43 pm 6

    Playgroups are kids being brought together, generally at somebody’s house, to play. A childcare center is a group babysitting service. The two concepts rarely if ever intersect.

    Making a comic connection between “How many in your group” and “how many in your playgroup” is along the lines of replacing “cliff” with “fiscal cliff” for no reason other than that they share a final syllable.

    (Actually, that was Stahler too, wasn’t it?)

  7. mitch4 Feb 8th 2013 at 05:30 pm 7

    I thought Pollock’s (#3) callout to Wikipedia would be easily trumped by a visit to Urban Dictionary. Nope, nothing salacious or disreputable to be found on “playgroup”. :(

    OTOH, for either source come to think of it, we could make it say whatever we want. What, if anything, would a definition need to make this cartoon funny or interesting?

  8. Bob Feb 8th 2013 at 06:00 pm 8

    When I show up at a restaurant, the number of people with me doesn’t necessarily constitute the total number that would be dining as others might be on their way. So the mom and two kids show up first and the dad and another kid would be joining them later which makes the question about the playgroup number perfectly valid. Comic’s not that funny, btw.

  9. furrykef Feb 8th 2013 at 06:07 pm 9

    I dunno. I went to one of these when I was a kid and a lot of what we did seemed like play to me. One of my earliest memories is when they brought in an NES with Super Mario Bros., which was the hot new thing at the time. Apparently Nintendo gave these things away to various daycare centers in the hopes of creating lots of video game addicts. Worked on me, at any rate…

    Granted, they didn’t just let us do whatever we wanted all day, but aside from the NES and watching movies I have few memories. Other than the girls chanting “Boys go to Jupiter to get more stupider / Girls go to Mars to get more candy bars”… needless to say, that was not an officially sanctioned activity. :P

  10. furrykef Feb 8th 2013 at 06:11 pm 10

    Oh, and also:

    I’m Popeye the Sailor Man
    I live in a garbage can
    I turned on the heater and burned off my peter
    I’m Popeye the Sailor Man!

    This was also not officially sanctioned. ;)

  11. Kilby Feb 8th 2013 at 09:17 pm 11

    It wasn’t uproariously funny, but I thought the overly fluffy inquiry was worth a smile, and I saw nothing incongruous (@6) about taking a group of kids from home to the local facility (perhaps to park them there while the parent goes shopping). As for the “maître(sse) d’hotel“, that is hardly “bizarre” (@4), even the local IKEA has an attendant (with a computer terminal) checking the kids in and out of the ball cage and playroom area.

  12. James Pollock Feb 8th 2013 at 09:49 pm 12

    “Playgroups are kids being brought together, generally at somebody’s house, to play. A childcare center is a group babysitting service. The two concepts rarely if ever intersect.”

    Sorry, Bill, but I don’t that that word means what you think it does.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pre-school_playgroup

  13. Cidu Bill Feb 8th 2013 at 11:26 pm 13

    James, did you catch the “The term is widely used in the United Kingdom” line in the Wikipedia article? A lot of words have different meanings here and in England. If you don’t believe me, go outside wearing your pants.

    Bottom line is this: Everybody here who spent six years in a playgroup, raise your hand.

  14. Cidu Bill Feb 8th 2013 at 11:27 pm 14

    Actually, if you’d scrolled down in the Wikipedia article: “In the United States, a playgroup is an organization of parents with the expressed intent to have the children come together and play”

  15. James Pollock Feb 9th 2013 at 12:50 am 15

    “Actually, if you’d scrolled down in the Wikipedia article: “In the United States, a playgroup is an organization of parents with the expressed intent to have the children come together and play””

    Um, OK. In the drawing, there’s clearly a parent, with children, in a place where the children can play. I can see where you got confused.

  16. Cidu Bill Feb 9th 2013 at 01:02 am 16

    “Come together to play,” not “go out to some commercial establishment.” Playgroups are generally an in-home thing in the good old U S of A.

    Seriously, that “raising the hand” thing? That would be me.

  17. George P. Feb 9th 2013 at 08:04 am 17

    In the U.S. a playgroup is an event at which mothers get together to drink wine and tell stories about what an ordeal parenthood is. They pool their children so they don’t individually have to pay as much attention.

  18. James Pollock Feb 9th 2013 at 06:55 pm 18

    Bill: “Playgroups are generally an in-home thing in the good old U S of A.”
    vs.
    Wikipedia: “Churches, rec centers, and other community organizations sometimes sponsor weekly or monthly playgroups. ”

    The point is to get kids out of the house.

  19. Kilby Feb 10th 2013 at 09:43 am 19

    @ Bill (16) - I think you are hanging too hard to your interpretation of the meaning of the word. Try replacing it with “birthday party”. A traditional children’s birthday party should be held at home, with cake and ice cream and so forth. So why do so many restaurant chains (let’s not mention any McNames here) pad their profits with tacky, overpriced party offers aimed at kids? Similarly, a play group could be held anywhere, it doesn’t have to be at home.

  20. Mark in Boston Feb 11th 2013 at 09:16 pm 20

    Did your high school have a chapter of “Future Criminals of America”?

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